2007, Why Heidegger made the right step in 1933, International Journal of Zizek Studies. Vol. 1, No. 4.
Internal | External

2007 Fall, Tolerance as an Ideological Category, Critical Inquiry.
Internal | External

2007, Badiou: Notes from an Ongoing Debate, International Journal of Zizek Studies. Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 28-43.

In his Logiques des mondes (Badiou 2006), Alain Badiou provides a succinct definition of “democratic materialism” and its opposite, “materialist dialectics”: the axiom which condenses the first one is “There is nothing but bodies and languages …,” to which materialist dialectics adds “… with the exception of truths.” This opposition is not so much the opposition of two ideologies or philosophies as the opposition between non-reflected presuppositions/beliefs into which we are “thrown” insofar as we are immersed into our lifeworld, and the reflective attitude of thought proper which enables us to subtract ourselves from this immersion, to “unplug” ourselves, as Morpheus would have put it in The Matrix, a film much appreciated by Badiou, the film in which one also finds a precise account of the need, evoked by Badiou, to control oneself (when Morpheus explains to Neo the lot of ordinary people totally caught (“plugged”) in the Matrix, he says: “Everyone who is not unplugged is a potential agent”).
Internal | External

2006, Is Psychoanalysis Really Outmoded? Apropos the 150th Anniversary of Freuds Birth. Journal European Psychoanalysis. No. 23.
Internal | External

2005, Le devenir-lacanien de Deleuze, Savoirs et clinique No. 6.
Deleuze n’est pas un penseur de l’historicisme évolutionniste…
Internal | External

2005, Against Human Rights, New Left Review 34.

Alibi for militarist interventions, sacralization for the tyranny of the market, ideological foundation for the fundamentalism of the politically correct: can the ‘symbolic fiction’ of universal rights be recuperated for the progressive politicization of actual socio-economic relations?
Internal | External

2004, The Parallax View, New Left Review 25.

The philosophical basis for social action, as recast in Kojin Karatani’s striking Transcritique. On Kant and Marx. Slavoj Žižek investigates the irreducible antinomies of production and circulation—or economics and politics—as envisioned from the gap in between.
Internal | External

2004 Winter, The Ongoing Soft Revolution, Critical Inquiry.
In his admirable “The Pedagogy of Philosophy”, Jean-Jacques Lecercle described the scene of a yuppie on the Paris underground reading Deleuze and Guattari’s “What Is Philosophy?”…
Internal | External

2004, Why is Wagner Worth Saving? Journal of Philosophy and Scripture, Vol. 2, No. 1.

With Romanticism, music changes its role: it is no longer a mere accompaniment of the message delivered in speech, it contains/renders a message of its own, “deeper” than the one delivered in words. It was Rousseau who first clearly articulated this expressive potential of music as such, when he claimed that, instead of merely imitating the affective features of verbal speech, music should be given the right to “speak for itself” – in contrast to the deceiving verbal speech, in music, it is, to paraphrase Lacan, the truth itself which speaks. As Schopenhauer put it, music directly enacts/renders the noumenal Will, while speech remains limited to the level of phenomenal representation. Music is the substance which renders the true heart of the subject, which is what Hegel called the “Night of the World,” the abyss of radical negativity: music becomes the bearer of the true message beyond words with the shift from the Enlightenment subject of rational logosto the Romantic subject of the “night of the world,” i.e., with the shift of the metaphor for the kernel of the subject from Day to Night. Here we encounter the Uncanny: no longer the external transcendence, but, following Kant’s transcendental turn, the excess of the Night in the very heart of the subject (the dimension of the Undead), what Tomlison called the “internal otherworldliness that marks the Kantian subject.” What music renders is no longer the “semantics of the soul,” but the underlying “noumenal” flux of jouissance beyond the linguistic meaningfulness. This noumenal is radically different from the pre-Kantian transcendent divine Truth: it is the inaccessible excess which forms the very core of the subject.
Internal | External

2004, What can psychoanalysis tell us about cyberspace? Psychoanalytic Review, Vol. 91, No. 6.

Today, the media constantly bombard us with requests to choose, addressing us as subjects supposed to know what we really want (which book, clothes, TV program, place of holiday . . .)—“press A, if you want this, press B, if you want that,” or, to quote the motto of the recent “reflective” TV publicity campaign for advertisement itself, “Advertisement—the right to choose.” However, at a more fundamental level, the new media deprive the subject radically of the knowledge of what he wants: They address a thoroughly malleable subject who has constantly to be told what he wants, i.e., the very evocation of a choice to be made performatively creates the need for the object of choice.
Internal | External

2004, Burned by the Thing, European Journal of Psychoanalysis, No. 18.
In the traditional metaphysical approach, art is about (beautiful) appearances, and science is about reality beneath appearances…
Internal | External

2004 September 17th, Somewhere over the Rainbow, The Melbourne School of Continental Philosophy.
“What’s the Matter with Kansas? How Conservatives Won the Heart of America” by Thomas Frank
Internal | External

2004 January-February, The Parallax View, New Left Review 25.

The philosophical basis for social action, as recast in Kojin Karatani’s striking Transcritique. On Kant and Marx. Slavoj Žižek investigates the irreducible antinomies of production and circulation—or economics and politics—as envisioned from the gap in between.
Internal | External

2003 Winter-Spring, Fantasy Reloaded. On “The Matrix” Movies, European Journal of Psychoanalysis, No. 16.
The author analyzes the first two movies of the series “The Matrix”, interpreting them as essentially a political metaphor of the state of the leftist struggle against the capitalist ‘machine’
Internal | External

2002 Winter, A Plea for Leninist Intolerance, Critical Inquiry.
Internal | External

2002, A cyberspace Lenin: why not? International Socialism Journal, Vol. 95.
If there is a consensus among (whatever remains of) today’s radical left, it is that, in order to resuscitate the radical political project, one should leave behind the Leninist legacy: the ruthless focusing on the class struggle, the party as the privileged form of organisation, the violent revolutionary seizure of power, the ensuing ‘dictatorship of the proletariat’…are all these not ‘zombie-concepts’ to be abandoned if the left is to have any chance in the conditions of ‘post-industrial’ late capitalism?
Internal | External


Ippolit Belinski

Ippolit Belinski is the admin of Zizek.uk. He is an independent scholar working on Carl Schmitt and Hannah Arendt. Belinski has yet to publish his manuscript, though he often justifies the lack of publications by proclaiming to be a poet instead.

Tell us what you think...

Related Posts

- Newspapers and Magazines

Korean nuclear tension: Apocalypse… almost now

The saber rattling and harsh rhetoric during the current nuclear standoff on the Korean Peninsula should remind mankind of something we have forgotten. Atomic weapons are terrifying things, and talk of using them should be Read more…

- Newspapers and Magazines

Act Globally, Think Locally!

The looming military conflict between the US and North Korea contains a double danger. Although both sides, the US and North Korea, are for sure bluffing, not counting on an actual nuclear exchange, rhetoric never Read more…

- Newspapers and Magazines

Zizek’s Newspaper and Magazine Publications

2017 2017 September 11th, Korean nuclear tension: Apocalypse… almost now, RT. 2017 August 21st, Act Globally, Think Locally! The Philosophical Salon. 2017 July 9th, The problem with Venezuela’s revolution is that it didn’t go far enough, Independent. Why Read more…

%d bloggers like this: